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Live Fish

Apolla Shark

EFP0213

Regular price
$23.99 USD
Regular price
Sale price
$23.99 USD

The Apollo Shark has an elongated, cylindrical body with short whiskers and a pointed snout which is quite different from other Cyprinids.  They have a forked caudal fin and a dorsal fin that is set far back on their body.

Above the dark lateral line that extends from the nose through the caudal fin, healthy adult specimens are colored an almost olive green.   Below the lateral line, they are a silvery white color.

Apollo Sharks need to be housed in a tightly covered aquarium of at least 125 gallon capacity that has plenty of swimming area, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and a good deal of water movement.  Their tank should have a gravel or rocky substrate with a background of aquatic plants and some minimal Apollo Sharks need to be housed in a tightly covered aquarium of at least 125 gallon capacity that has plenty of swimming area, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and a good deal of water movement. Their tank should have a gravel or rocky substrate with a background of aquatic plants and some minimal driftwood or bogwood decorations. The greatest need for these fish is a lot of free swimming space. Tank decorations that clutter up their swimming areas should be avoided.

Although Apollo Sharks are active predators that spend most of their time on or near the surface of the tank, on occasion they will forage on the bottom. In a community tank setting, they are peaceful when housed in small shoals of 6 to 12 fish, but do not do well when kept individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 specimens. They are best kept with other robust similar sized species such as Tinfoil Barbs and Bala Sharks. Smaller fish could be viewed as food.

Apollo Sharks are energetic swimmers that are easily startled and because they occupy the uppermost portion of the water column, a tightly fitting tank cover is mandatory for these expert jumpers. Canister filters and powerheads are also a good choice for this species to ensure the pristine water quality and high oxygen levels they require in their tank.
or Apollo Sharks need to be housed in a tightly covered aquarium of at least 125 gallon capacity that has plenty of swimming area, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and a good deal of water movement. Their tank should have a gravel or rocky substrate with a background of aquatic plants and some minimal driftwood or bogwood decorations. The greatest need for these fish is a lot of free swimming space. Tank decorations that clutter up their swimming areas should be avoided.

Although Apollo Sharks are active predators that spend most of their time on or near the surface of the tank, on occasion they will forage on the bottom. In a community tank setting, they are peaceful when housed in small shoals of 6 to 12 fish, but do not do well when kept individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 specimens. They are best kept with other robust similar sized species such as Tinfoil Barbs and Bala Sharks. Smaller fish could be viewed as food.

Apollo Sharks are energetic swimmers that are easily startled and because they occupy the uppermost portion of the water column, a tightly fitting tank cover is mandatory for these expert jumpers. Canister filters and powerheads are also a good choice for this species to ensure the pristine water quality and high oxygen levels they require in their tank.
 decorations.  The greatest need for these fish is a lot of free swimming space.   Tank decorations that clutter up their swimming areas should be avoided.

Although Apollo Sharks are active predators that spend most of their time on or near the surface of the tank, on occasion they will forage on the bottom.  In a community tank setting, they are peaceful when housed in small shoals of 6 to 12 fish, but do not do well when kept individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 specimens.   They are best kept with other robust similar sized species such asApollo Sharks need to be housed in a tightly covered aquarium of at least 125 gallon capacity that has plenty of swimming area, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and a good deal of water movement. Their tank should have a gravel or rocky substrate with a background of aquatic plants and some minimal driftwood or bogwood decorations. The greatest need for these fish is a lot of free swimming space. Tank decorations that clutter up their swimming areas should be avoided.

Although Apollo Sharks are active predators that spend most of their time on or near the surface of the tank, on occasion they will forage on the bottom. In a community tank setting, they are peaceful when housed in small shoals of 6 to 12 fish, but do not do well when kept individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 specimens. They are best kept with other robust similar sized species such as Tinfoil Barbs and Bala Sharks. Smaller fish could be viewed as food.

Apollo Sharks are energetic swimmers that are easily startled and because they occupy the uppermost portion of the water column, a tightly fitting tank cover is mandatory for these expert jumpers. Canister filters and powerheads are also a good choice for this species to ensure the pristine water quality and high oxygen levels they require in their tank.  Smaller fish could be viewed as food.

Apollo Sharks are energetic swimmers that are easily startled and because they occupy the uppermost portion of the water column, a tightly fitting tank cover is mandatory for these expert jumpers.   Apollo Sharks need to be housed in a tightly covered aquarium of at least 125 gallon capacity that has plenty of swimming area, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and a good deal of water movement. Their tank should have a gravel or rocky substrate with a background of aquatic plants and some minimal driftwood or bogwood decorations. The greatest need for these fish is a lot of free swimming space. Tank decorations that clutter up their swimming areas should be avoided.

Although Apollo Sharks are active predators that spend most of their time on or near the surface of the tank, on occasion they will forage on the bottom. In a community tank setting, they are peaceful when housed in small shoals of 6 to 12 fish, but do not do well when kept individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 specimens. They are best kept with other robust similar sized species such as Tinfoil Barbs and Bala Sharks. Smaller fish could be viewed as food.

Apollo Sharks are energetic swimmers that are easily startled and because they occupy the uppermost portion of the water column, a tightly fitting tank cover is mandatory for these expert jumpers. Canister filters and powerheads are also a good choice for this species to ensure the pristine water quality and high oxygen levels they require in their tank 
and powerheads are also a good choice for this species to ensure the pristine water quality and high oxygen levels they require in their tank.